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Overseas Seafood Restaurant is a Chinese restaurant located along Springvale Road in Forest Hill serving your typical Chinese main dishes but also serving Yum Cha for lunch. For Yum Cha, they offer a wide selection of Yum Cha dishes like Siu Mai (Pork Dumplings) and Congee.

We found the service to be a bit average, which I guess is the norm in Chinese restaurants and especially so when it gets busy for Yum Cha. Food-wise, the Siu Mai had decent flavour but the congee lacked that slight saltiness.

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Their Prawn filling wrapped in Beancurd skins was quite tasty. Having a bit of bite with the filling and the slightly sweet fried beancurd skin making a nice combination.

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The Yam Cake and Lo Bak Go (Steamed Radish Cake) were tasty. The Lo Bak Go just needed to be a bit more crispy, but flavour-wise it was good. It had good radish flavour.

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The Salted Egg Custard steamed buns were sadly overdone. Inside was not runny as it was supposed to be. A disappointment.

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The Har Gow (Prawn dumpling) lacked flavour, and required the chilli sauce to add the saltiness to it. Bland.

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The dumplings here had a decently tasting filling. 

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Last words

Overseas Seafood Restaurant does decent Yum Cha, and honestly around the eastern suburbs it’s difficult to find great Yum Cha so luckily Overseas Seafood Restaurant is above average at the very least.

Overseas Seafood Restaurant Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Overseas Seafood Restaurant
482 Springvale Road
Forest Hill VIC 3131

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Want a deliciously, warm and sweet treat for the cold weather? These Chinese dumplings or Tang Yuan are perfect for a cold day. The ginger sugar syrup has a lovely subtle ginger flavour, not too overpowering and the oozy black sesame is always a winner in my book. These dumplings can be made with fillings or without, and that’s really the fun of it all. Well, apart from eating it!

Black Sesame Dumplings (Tang Yuan) (Adapted from Rasa Malaysia)
Serves: 4-6 people
Cooking Time: 45 minutes
Preparation Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients
Black Sesame Dough
230g glutinous rice flour
180ml water
1-2tsp black sesame powder (optional)

Coloured Dumplings
200g glutinous rice flour
120ml water
1/2 tbsp sugar
Colouring

Black Sesame Filling
60g black sesame seeds
45g caster sugar
45g unsalted butter

Ginger Syrup
1200ml water (reduced to 4 cups after boiling)
180g rock sugar
4 slices ginger
2 pandan leaves (tied in a knot)

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Method
Black Sesame Filling
1. Lightly toast the black sesame seeds over medium heat until it’s aromatic. Take off the heat and let it cool.

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2. Use a mini food processor to grind the black sesame seeds until it becomes a fine powder.

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3. Place the cooled ground black sesame into a saucepan and heat over low-medium heat, and add sugar and butter and stir well to form a thick paste. If it’s too dry, add more butter. Place the paste into a bowl and let cool in the fridge so it’s easier to fill the dumplings later on.

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Black Sesame Dough
4. In a big bowl, mix the glutinous rice flour with water (adding the optional black sesame powder too) until it forms a smooth paste and no longer sticks to your hands. Divide it equally into 16-20 balls (the bigger the balls, the easier it is to fill) Note: The coloured dumplings follow similar steps, just add the sugar when adding the water.

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5. Flatten each ball in your palm, and then spoon in the black sesame paste and lay it in the middle of the flatten ball. Fold the edge to seal the dumpling. Lightly roll it into a ball shape using both palms, very gently and delicately. Set aside.

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Ginger Syrup
6.  Boil the water on medium-high heat.

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7. Add the ginger, pandan leaves and rock sugar into the water and boil for 10-15 minutes with medium heat. Lower heat to simmer and reduce to about 4 cups of water. Add more sugar if it’s not sweet enough.
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Dumplings
8. Heat up another pot of boiling water. Drop the dumplings into the hot boiling water. As soon as they float to the top, transfer them out and into a bowl of the ginger syrup. Turn off heat and serve the black sesame dumplings immediately.

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Black Sesame Tang Yuan
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You:
Rate this recipe!
Want a deliciously, warm and sweet treat for the cold weather? These Chinese dumplings or Tang Yuan are perfect for a cold day. The ginger sugar syrup has a lovely subtle ginger flavour, not too overpowering and the oozy black sesame is always a winner in my book.
Prep Time
15Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45Minutes 15Minutes
Prep Time
15Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45Minutes 15Minutes
Black Sesame Tang Yuan
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Want a deliciously, warm and sweet treat for the cold weather? These Chinese dumplings or Tang Yuan are perfect for a cold day. The ginger sugar syrup has a lovely subtle ginger flavour, not too overpowering and the oozy black sesame is always a winner in my book.
Prep Time
15Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45Minutes 15Minutes
Prep Time
15Minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
45Minutes 15Minutes
Ingredients
Black Sesame Dough
  • 230g Glutinous Rice Flour
  • 180ml Water
  • 1-2tsp Black Sesame PowderOptional
Coloured Dumplings
  • 200g Glutinous Rice Flour
  • 120ml Water
  • 1/2tbsp Sugar
  • Food ColouringOptional
Black Sesame Filling
  • 60g Black Sesame Seeds
  • 45g Caster Sugar
  • 45g Unsalted Butter
Ginger Syrup
  • 1200ml Water
  • 180g Rock Sugar
  • 4Slices Ginger
  • 2 Pandan leavesTied in a Knot
Servings: People
Units:
Instructions
Black Sesame Filling
  1. Lightly toast the black sesame seeds over medium heat until it's aromatic. Take off the heat and let it cool.
  1. Use a mini food processor to grind the black sesame seeds until it becomes a fine powder.
  2. Place the cooled ground black sesame into a saucepan and heat over low-medium heat, and add sugar and butter and stir well to form a thick paste. If it's too dry, add more butter. Place the paste into a bowl and let cool in the fridge so it's easier to fill the dumplings later on.
Black Sesame Dough
  1. In a big bowl, mix the glutinous rice flour with water (adding the optional black sesame powder too) until it forms a smooth paste and no longer sticks to your hands. Divide it equally into 16-20 balls (the bigger the balls, the easier it is to fill) Note: The coloured dumplings follow similar steps, just add the sugar when adding the water.
  2. Flatten each ball in your palm, and then spoon in the black sesame paste and lay it in the middle of the flatten ball. Fold the edge to seal the dumpling. Lightly roll it into a ball shape using both palms, very gently and delicately. Set aside.
Ginger Syrup
  1. Boil the water on medium-high heat.
  2. Add the ginger, pandan leaves and rock sugar into the water and boil for 10-15 minutes with medium heat. Lower heat to simmer and reduce to about 4 cups of water. Add more sugar if it's not sweet enough.
Dumplings
  1. Heat up another pot of boiling water. Drop the dumplings into the hot boiling water. As soon as they float to the top, transfer them out and into a bowl of the ginger syrup. Turn off heat and serve the black sesame dumplings immediately.
Recipe Notes

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  • Lard can be substituted for butter if you so prefer, or margarine for a less buttery taste.
  • Try adding less filling first to see if you can close the balls properly, as they might leak if they are not closed properly during cooking.
  • Boil the dumplings in a separate pot to the ginger syrup as the flour from the dumplings may make your syrup cloudy or in the off chance the black sesame bursts out of the dough.
  • Filling-less dumplings uses the same method as the filling dumplings, just adding a bit of sugar for sweetness.
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Kim Sing opened its doors earlier this year under new management after Madam Kwan closed down. Their menu has been tweaked and a number of menu items have been removed from the menu, but Kim Sing still has a mixture of Malaysian/Chinese style dishes on offer and they advertise itself as Kim Sing, Truly Malaysian Delights. So expectations are high with that statement.

More often than not, I always try a new Malaysian restaurant’s Curry Laksa to see if they can trump Laksa King and Chef Lagenda. Kim Sing’s Laksa is a letdown, and substantially poorer quality than its predecessor. It has this watery, curry powder flavoured taste to it. A Curry Laksa it ain’t.

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Their Char Kway Teow is served in a bowl, for some odd reason and with Madam Kwan’s logo still placed on all its crockery. It has that ‘wok’ flavour, so thank goodness for that but there are several oddities with this dish. It uses Char Siew (BBQ Pork) as its protein instead of Lap Cheong (Chinese Sausage). The prawns are tiny, and they don’t add in the deep fried Pork Lard but usually I can live without that. We also ordered it spicy, but no heat to it whatsoever. The substitution of Lap Cheong with Char Siew completely changes the taste of the Char Kway Teow. Very strange.

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The Salt & Pepper Chicken Ribs with rice was actually quite nice. No chilli, which I think it needs to give it a bit of kick and depth of flavour but the chicken is crispy and still moist but they aren’t very generous with their fried capsicum and onion which I think is needed to give the chicken and rice much needed flavour. Decent but you can probably find better elsewhere in Box Hill.

Last words

Kim Sing unfortunately does not live up to its Truly Malaysian Delights statement. It serves quite frankly, mediocre dishes that are so disparate from traditional Malaysian dishes.

Kim Sing Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Kim Sing
Shop 3, 1 Main Street
Box Hill VIC 3128

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From the outside, Shanghai 1930‘s appearance can be a bit deceiving. However, once you enter its doors you’ll find that it has a lovely contemporary yet traditional aesthetic. Shanghai 1930 offers traditional Chinese cuisine, with Shanghai influences on the menu as well. Their menu has a variety of dumplings to choose from, and many chicken, beef, seafood and vegetarian options as well.

Their Crispy Noodles with Beef was actually quite tasty with tender beef. The sauce that it comes with, however, is quite strong, and leans on the salty side but nonetheless the combination of crispy noodles and beef and vegetables, is a winning combination.

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Shanghai 1930 offer what they call “Grandma’s Secret Fried Rice”, and it’s apparent that it isn’t your typical fried rice. The use of chives and I believe spinach adds to the flavour of the fried rice, and it’s cooked with the traditionally used Chinese sausage. 

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If you ever walk past this restaurant, you may notice the image of these dumplings. These are the Steamed Shanghai Dumplings that are fried on the bottom with sesame seeds. The pastry (or dough) reminds me of the dough used in Pork Buns, but a bit thinner. The crispy bottom with the traditional pork and ginger filling is an amazingly tasty combination and I’m so glad I tried it.

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Their soups you can order as one serve or for sharing. The Hot & Sour soup is what you’d expect, and has that lovely balance of heat and sourness, and just enough sweetness that nothing overwhelms the other. Yum.

Last words

While, Shanghai 1930 may not be one of the “cheap eats” in Box Hill, it certainly makes up for it with its delicious dishes on offer.

Shanghai 1930 Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Shanghai 1930
959 Whitehorse Road
Box Hill VIC 3128

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Not to be confused with Wong’s Lucky Bar, Wong’s Kitchen on Station Street in Box Hill is a Chinese/Cantonese restaurant that most people seem to come for their seafood dishes. Wong’s Kitchen isn’t a very large restaurant, so more often than not, bookings are required.

Crab and egg noodles are probably one of my favourite Chinese dishes as a kid. The crab flavour combined with the wok stir fried noodles is delicious and I could honestly eat just the noodles all on its own. The crab at Wong’s Kitchen is quite nice too, I might add.

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One of my favourite vegetables is Chinese broccoli (Kai Lan), there’s something about the crunchiness of the stem and you honestly don’t need much else apart from a bit of garlic. 

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According to the staff, their chicken served here is free range. I’m not certain how true that is, but it is a more lean as chicken. Not particularly memorable dish, it’s decent though.

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I remember having Salted Egg Yolk Prawns at Kingsway Seafood Restaurant, which is now sadly closed. The prawns here are quite nice, crispy and have that lovely egg yolk batter that covers the tender prawns. I can’t have too many though because it’s very rich, but I needed to have a few to satisfy my craving.

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A standard dish when we go out to a Chinese restaurant, is their fish. I love sauce that usually accompanies steamed fish, and here it’s just how I like it. The fish was also nicely cooked and fresh.

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Wong’s Kitchen also provide complimentary fruits and Red Bean Sago dessert. Lovely end to a meal.

Last words

While Wong’s Kitchen won’t wow you with it’s ambience or service, it’s food is tasty and doesn’t burn a hole in your pocket.

Wong's Kitchen Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Wong’s Kitchen
596 Station Street
Box Hill VIC 3128

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